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Amazing Pre and Post Storm Aerial Sandy Photos | Weather

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Amazing Pre and Post Storm Aerial Sandy Photos
Weather
Amazing Pre and Post Storm Aerial Sandy Photos

When all is said and done, it turns out that Superstorm Sandy could be the 2nd costliest hurricane on record with $73.1 bill on in damage. This is of course behind Katrina, but Sandy had a much larger impact on the US than Katrina did in terms of coastal damage and damage to area that are not used to hurricanes. This is a compilation of pictures taken from the air before and after Sandy of the Jersey shoreline.... I am still amazed at how this storm developed and transformed as it moved up the eastern seaboard!

This article is straight from The USGS and the way to visualize it is to look at the number in front of the text, then the map below to see the location, then down to the images I will have numbered. Pretty wild!

 

Location 1: Oblique aerial photographs of Long Branch, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and currents removed sand from the beach exposing erosion control structures, including rock walls, concrete walls, and groins that protrude seaward perpendicular to the beach. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 2: Oblique aerial photographs of Deal, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Large erosional scarps are visible in the low cliff, indicating likely overtopping of the rock shore protection structures. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 3: Oblique aerial photographs of Mantoloking, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge cut across the barrier island at Mantoloking, NJ, eroding a wide beach, destroying houses and roads, and depositing sand onto the island and into the back-bay. Construction crews with heavy machinery are seen clearing sand from roads and pushing sand seaward to build a wider beach and protective berm just days after the storm. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 4: Oblique aerial photographs of Mantoloking, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge eroded the beach exposing building foundations, protective dunes, and houses in this part on Mantoloking. The burned houses are visible in the center of the bottom photograph. Only a few pilings remain of the first line of houses. Sediment was deposited on the island, remains on some roads, or has been cleared and placed in large piles in the parking lot behind the house marked by the arrow on the right. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature. 

Location 5: Oblique aerial photographs of Seaside Heights, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge destroyed the dunes and boardwalk, and deposited the sand on the island, covering roads. The red arrow points to a building that was washed off of its foundation and moved about a block away from its original location. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 6: Oblique aerial photographs of Seaside Height Pier, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge eroded the beach and destroyed the seaward edge of the pier and deposited the roller coaster superstructure in the ocean. Sediment deposited on the island is visible in the background and indicates that overwash occurred here. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 7: Oblique aerial photographs of Island Beach State Park, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm surge and waves eroded the front face of the dunes and overwash is indicated by sand deposited in the parking lot behind the beach. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 8: Oblique aerial photographs of Brigantine, NJ. View looking northwest along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge eroded the beach and exposed the seawall. Overwash of the seawall is indicated by sand deposited on the street. Low dunes on the eastern flank of the seawall were eroded. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

Location 9: Oblique aerial photographs of Stone Harbor Point, NJ. View looking northwest along the New Jersey shore. Wave attack on the dunes resulted in erosion and retreat, leaving a distinctive erosional scarp on the seaward face of the dune. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature.

 

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