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Atlanta Weather | Last Eclipse A Special One
News, Weather
Atlanta Weather | Last Eclipse A Special One

When the Moon passes directly between the Sun and Earth, the usual outcome is either a total or annular solar eclipse. But the event on November 3rd is something of a hybrid. At the point in the North Atlantic where the Moon's umbral shadow begins its dash across Earth, about 600 miles (1,000 km) east of Jacksonville, Florida, an extremely well-placed observer would get to see a vestigial ring of Sun surrounding the Moon's silhouette for a few fleeting seconds just after sunrise.
 

But after that, as it races southeastward, the shadow's footprint is also moving closer to the Moon due to Earth's curvature. So the appearance switches to and remains a total eclipse — though a relatively short one. "Greatest eclipse," offering 99½ seconds of totality, occurs about 12:46 Universal Time at a point about 200 miles (330 km) southwest of the Liberian coast. 

During the previous hybrid solar eclipse, in April 2005, a stretch of totality was sandwiched between annular views at the beginning and end. This year's edition is especially rare because it begins with annularity and ends with totality.
 

We will have mostly clear skies Sunday morning. The eclipse will take place between 6:45am and 10:15am.

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